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105.7 WROR / Boston

Harvey Wharfield – The Rock Radio Reunion, 105.7 WROR Framingham/Boston | September 21, 2002 – 2:00pm

Nine years ago this month, Classic Hits station 105.7 WROR decided to switch gears for a weekend, bringing in some of the most legendary Rock Jocks ever heard in Boston, and transforming WROR into a 1970s-style AOR station. In fact, it was the most accurate representation/re-enactment of the old format I’ve ever heard.

Here is one of your webmaster’s all-time favorite ‘Rock Jocks’, Harvey Wharfield. Wharfield made a name for himself at Top 40 WVBF… ironically, the station that was on 105.7 in the mid-1970s. From there, Wharfield moved on to Rocker 107.3 WAAF Worcester. From the end of the 70s through approximately 1980 (I don’t remember exactly when he left), Wharfield could be heard in all five New England states, as WAAF’s signal – the transmitter back in those days was on Mt. Asnebumskit in Paxton MA alongside BM competitor WSRS, was third biggest in New England, behind 94.9 WHOM up on Mt. Washington and the aforementioned WSRS.

Wharfield would later move on to WCOZ and stay right up until the station went CHR as WZOU in 1984. From there, I’m not sure where he went. But it was sure GOOD to hear him here on WROR this September weekend back in ’02.

Thanks to Contributor (and fellow DX’er) Jeff Lehman for recording and sending in this bit of wonderful audio!


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12 Comments


  1. loved warfield on WAAF. I could hear him in the hills of rensselaer co. ny!! what a signal that station had! somebody told me the WAAF tower is on some mountain in new hampshire is that true?

    Reply

    • Actually, Entercom moved WAAF’s city of license to Westborough and moved the transmitter there to a new tower. One of the DUMBEST moves ever, Entercom was willing to sacrifice a six-state signal just to get 2dbu more over the city of Boston. The signal since the tower move is barely one-third what it was. I believe that WAAF still has legal access to the old tower in Paxton as a backup.

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  2. Wharfield worked at WZLX in the mid 80s through the early 90s. Great DJ. What ever happened to him? What is he doing these days?

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  3. Yes, I loved Wharfield too! From his early days at VBF in the mid-70s to his later stint at ZLX. However, Harvey was at his peak as the leader of the “rock n’ roll airforce” and “king of all halibuts” at WAAF Circa (1980-1983). I agree, the station had awesome coverage from the Paxton transmitter with a good signal in most of the metro Boston, Providence and Springfield population centers. It could also be heard in Manchester and parts of the metro Hartford area despite being close to WCCC. The new transmitter sucks!

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    • I had always wanted to work at WAAF and my dream job was to work there along side Harvey Wharfield. So, one day in 1981, one of my friends who somehow knew Wharfield, managed to get a tour of WAAF while he was on the air. I gotta tell you, WAAF and Wharfield FIT the Rock image that they presented on the air.

      I was amazed to find out that there really WAS (and might still be) the Cocaine Realty Building in downtown Worcester. The studios were on… I think, the seventh floor. You walk into the lobby and it was a combined office complex for WAAF and WFTQ. The first tour was through the WFTQ main studios. Nice and bright, the main control room was on the sunny side of the building. They were still playing music in 1981, and this was an AM Stereo operation. Looked to be the a full service kind of format (although I can’t remember firsthand). Next, we went over into WAAF. Just as one might have imagined, WAAF main control was like a journey into altered-states. The walls were completely black, with Rock posters all over. While there was probably a main light for the room, it was off. The main console was in the dead center of the room, and the whole console area was arranged more like a stage, with the board facing the center of the building (facing the room entrance), the turntables on either side of the board and if I remember correctly, there were spotlights shining down from a rack directly above the main board. Also, in this somewhat rectangular ‘stage’, were various reel to reel machines, cart machines, and under the ‘board’ WAAF’s Album collection was, arranged in some manner on either side of the operator’s position and under the board itself.

      The way this was arranged, with the main console and operator’s position in the center of the room, and the lighting arrangement, with the only light surrounding the WAAF main board was coming in the rear window and from the spot lighting over the board… it was almost a psychadelic experience simply being there.

      And then there was Wharfield. He seemed to be in an angry mood that day if I recall correctly. When people had misplaced some studio things, he seemed to fly into a rage and throw something. But its been many years and perhaps it didn’t quite happen that way. Either way, it seemed to only enhance his personna.

      I know this isn’t exactly what you were talking about, but when you mentioned Wharfield and WAAF it reminded me of my visit.

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  4. Wow, Talk about a blast from the past…Harvey Garfield was one of the nicest D.J.’s I ever had the pleasure to talk to! I lived in Waltham, MA from 1965 until 1979 when I married and moved to AZ! We must have spent a cumulative month, talking on the telephone! We were suppose to meet up at the Grand Funk Railroad concert at Boston Gardens in 1974-75! But I couldn’t get a ride and I wasn’t bold enough to lie my way into Boston on the “T”! I was so dissppointed and a little embarrassed to tell Harvey, I couldn’t get the the “Gardens”. Back then there wasn’t all this legal crap, clogging up everyone’s good times! I also won Frankie Valley & the Four Seasons and Sha Na Na tickets, Blazing Saddles tickets, $100.00 and several albums! Looking back, he made me feel like I counted at an age when I didn’t know if I counted! I would hack off a digit for a chance to talk to him again! HARVEY WHARFIELD where-ever you are, you’re still aces in my book, turntable, tape or CD!
    Love Forever, Diana

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  5. I forgot to mention the call letters, I believe it was WVBF Boston I can’t for the life of me remember the dial numbers but ah…those were the days!

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  6. Harvey Wharfield ( Real Name: William (Billy) H. Gilpatrick III) moved to New Hampshire after his stint in radio. I think he was doing something with self-hypnosis to help folks stop smoking, if memory serves me correctly. That was maybe 15/20 years ago. Anyone know where he is today?

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  7. Harvey was on WCGY from about 1990 till it became WCLB around 1994.

    While at CGY Harvey was a unfettered sponsor of local rock bands and their music. Every Sunday night he hosted the, I believe, longest block of local bands ever in the Boston area!

    From 6pm till 10pm you would hear everyone who submitted a good sounding record! Sure he tossed in the occasional Aerosmith or J. Geils song in, but 99% of what was played was unsigned local acts that otherwise would not have had a shot getting on a major city radio show. I know because I was one of them and am still very grateful to Harvey for the exposure and gigs his support sent my way.

    Not sure where Harvey is now but I certainly hope he is doing what he loves and getting well paid for it! -Paul Tait

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  8. Harvey is and was the best dj ever

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  9. Steve, any idea where he is he today? I figured since you posted this a couple of times, maybe he reached out to you.

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    • No idea. I met him in 1983 at WAAF, followed his career to WCOZ and then left for the Navy. I have not heard from him since, but I last heard he was on WZLX in Boston but I haven’t been up there to hear him, if he’s still there.

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